Tag Archives: mickey rourke

Sam’s Top 42 Films of the Decade

Just for the sake of my own sanity and desperate need to have these written somewhere, I give you my favourite forty-two films of the past decade. There are at least fifty-six other films I would like to put onto a list, but I think I need to forcefully prevent any more decade-based listmaking as quickly as possible. So beneath is the top ten list, along with a sentence or two on each film and then thirty-two, out-of-list-order, films which I had to include.

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Sam’s Top Ten of the Year

You can listen to us discussing these films at length on the podcast on the show, but please do check out the list below for perpetuity. Sam’s list is annotated and included below, Tom’s is not annotated and its right here. This just means you will have to check out the podcast to hear Tom’s viewpoints. So check out Sam’s choices after the jump, along with a few choice thoughts and honourable mentions. Enjoy!

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Stallone Updates on Expendables

The Expendables, the imminent, sure-to-be-amazing beef-fest being helmed in all senses by Sylvester Stallone has had a number of casting rumours floating about, including bringing in the likes of Arnie, Dolph Lundgren and JCVD to add to the already gonzo cast.

Stallone has now written in to AICN to confirm the cast members, giving us some updates on the change from Forest Whitaker to Curtis Jackson (aka 50 Cent) and the replacement of Ben Kingsley with Eric Roberts. Both seem pretty poor on paper although Sly has gone to lengths to defend all choices in his letter. To give a quick rundown, the casting is like this: 

Hale Caesar is Curtis Jackson
Toll Road (new character) is Randy Couture
Monroe is Eric Roberts
Tool (an ex-Expendable) is Mickey Rourke
Bao is Jet Li
Lee Christmas is Jason Statham
Lacy is Charisma Carpenter
Sandra is Giselle Itie (famous Brazilian actress)
And
Barney ‘the schizo’ Ross is Yours Truly.

Whether it turns out good or not, just considering the possibilities of this cast, including Jason Statham playing Lee Christmas and Mickey Rourke as Tool, is good enough for me.

Movie News Round-Up

thor

Much rumour rising about Marvel adaptation Thor with Alexander Skarsgard being touted for the lead role. He brilliantly played Brad Colbert in David Simon and Ed Burns’ Generation Kill and is currently in Tru Blood. Separately to that, the film joined Captain America and The Avengers in being pushed back in the release schedules with 2011 now housing Thor, Captain America and Spiderman 4 within three months. In further Marvel news, Mickey Rourke has signed up for Iron Man 2 along with Scarlett Johansson, the latter replacing Emily Blunt as the Black Widow. As if not to be outdone, this week also saw rumours sparked of a possible reboot for the Fantastic Four series.

Juan Antonio Bayona, the director of the excellent The Orphanage, has reportedly been signed up to direct the third Twilight movie. This comes hot on the heels of previous rumours that Drew Barrymore was a candidate to helm the movie. I don’t care a huge amount, but if we are going to have to live with these movies for the coming two-and-a-half years, it would be nice to have some real talent behind the camera. Other reports though suggest that it will be directed by the other Weitz.

Sam Raimi’s return to the horror genre with Drag Me to Hell has a trailer; Axel Foley could die in Beverley Hills Cop 4; Nick Nolte and Tom Hardy will star in a mixed martial arts movie. Oh yeah!; Bryce Dallas Howard has expressed an interest in bringing the Luna Brothers’ The Sword to the screen; Heathers has been jumped into gear in musical form; Robin Hood has found his merry men.

Movie News Round-Up

jayandsilentbob

Kevin Smith is to launch outside of his comfort zone (no View Askew, no Scott Mosier producing) to direct A Couple of Cops, a buddy movie to star Bruce Willis and Tracy Morgan. Could provide an interesting view on how Smith is developing as a director and possibly give the world another really good buddy movie which, on premise, seems closely in the vein of late-80s Shane Black-style stuff.

Zack Snyder is forming an all-girl cast for Sucker Punch, about girls in a mental asylum who fantasises about escaping with all her inmates. Likely to star the likes of Amanda Seyfried, Vanessa Hudgens, Abbie Cornish, Evan Rachel Wood and Emma Stone. Doesn’t specifically make me too excited but I would be interested to see what Snyder does next because he handled the entire Watchmen saga, the build-up and movie, with aplomb.

Megan Fox has begun to take up some new offers which are likely to offer very little new to her current persona. Fox has reportedly joined the cast of Jonah Hex alongside Josh Brolin and will star in Fathom, an adaptation of the comic series. Cinematical reports that Fox has been a fan of the comic series for some time and is helping to bring it to the screen, likely making her the dream girl for many, many JoBlo readers around the world. Maybe however she should get a little praise for understanding that she has limits and using her talents in the most lucrative way possible. Hats off to Ms Fox.

Leonardo DiCaprio is to team with Christopher Nolan on the latter’s post-Dark Knight project, Inception. the film has been described as a science fiction piece ‘set in the architecture of the mind’ and was also written by Nolan. You’d have to suggest that this won’t garner anything near the level of business Dark Knight did but it’s good to see Nolan is nourishing his filmmaking skills elsewhere, something that would have been advisable to Sam Raimi back in the day and would most likely have provided the world with better Spiderman sequels.

Talk is rife on what the next Danny Boyle movie will be. Reports emerged early in the week, very speculative, that he could direct the next James Bond. Later however, it seems he is closing in on doing a remake of My Fair Lady, putting of another project called Hanna, about a teenage assassin.

Also in the news: Jim Jarmusch’s Limits of Control has a trailer; Mickey Rourke, Vince Cassell and Alice Braga will star in an adaptation of Paulo Coehlo’s 11 Minutes; A viewpoint from Slate on how a Tarantino Watchmen would look; Barry Sonnenfeld will direct an adaptation of Korean film Scandal Makers; Keira Knightley is to star in Never Let Me Go, an adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s amazing novel, which you should probably read instead now Knightley has signed up; A three minute clip of The Boat that Rocked has turned up; Ed Zwick is to direct In the Heart of the Sea by Nathan Philbrick; Ridley Scott has talked a little more about his Monopoly movie.

BAFTA Predictions

bafta2

So, here in print, are our predictions for this year’s BAFTAs. Please check out the podcast in which we discuss what you will find here. Also, here is the full list of nominations for your perusal.

Best Picture – The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Frost/Nixon, Milk, The Reader, Slumdog Millionaire
Sam: Slumdog Millionaire
Beth: Slumdog Millionaire
Tom: Slumdog Millionaire

Best British Film – Hunger, In Bruges, Mamma Mia, Man on Wire, Slumdog Millionaire
Sam: Man on Wire
Beth: Slumdog Millionaire
Tom: Slumdog Millionaire

Best Director – Clint Eastwood (Changeling), David Fincher (The Curious Case of Benjamin Button), Ron Howard (Frost/Nixon), Stephen Daldry (The Reader), Danny Boyle (Slumdog Millionaire)
Sam: Danny Boyle
Beth: Danny Boyle
Tom: Danny Boyle

Best Actor – Frank Langella (Frost/Nixon), Dev Patel (Slumdog Millionaire), Sean Penn (Milk), Brad Pitt (The Curious Case of Benjamin Button), Mickey Rourke (The Wrestler)
Sam: Mickey Rourke
Beth: Dev Patel
Tom: Mickey Rourke

Best Actress – Angelina Jolie (Changeling), Kristin Scott Thomas (I’ve Loved You So Long), Meryl Streep (Doubt), Kate Winslet (The Reader), Kate Winslet (Revolutionary Road)
Sam: Kate Winslet (The Reader)
Beth: Kate Winslet (The Reader)
Tom: Kate Winslet (The Reader)

Best Supporting Actor – Robert Downey Jr (Tropic Thunder), Brendan Gleason (In Bruges), Philip Seymour Hoffman (Doubt), Heath Ledger (The Dark Knight), Brad Pitt (Burn After Reading)
Sam: Heath Ledger
Beth: Heath Ledger
Tom: Heath Ledger

Best Supporting Actress – Amy Adams (Doubt), Penelope Cruz (Vicky Cristina Barcelona), Freida Pinto (Slumdog Millionaire), Tilda Swinton (Burn After Reading), Marisa Tomei (The Wrestler)
Sam: Penelope Cruz
Beth: Marisa Tomei
Tom: Amy Adams

Best Original Screenplay – Burn After Reading, Changeling, I’ve Loved You So Long, In Bruges, Milk
Sam: In Bruges
Beth: Milk
Tom: In Bruges

Best Adapted Screenplay – The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Frost/Nixon, The Reader, Revolutionary Road, Slumdog Millionaire
Sam: Slumdog Millionaire
Beth: Slumdog Millionaire
Tom: The Reader

Best Foreign Language – Baader Meinhof Complex, Gomorrah, I’ve Loved You So Long, Persepolis, Waltz with Bashir
Sam: Waltz with Bashir
Beth: Persepolis
Tom: Waltz with Bashir

Best Animated – Wall-E, Waltz with Bashir, Persepolis
Sam: Wall-E
Beth: Wall-E
Tom: Wall-E

Orange Rising Star – Michael Cera, Michael Fassbender, Noel Clarke, Rebecca Hall, Toby Kebbell
Sam: Michael Fassbender
Beth: Toby Kebbell
Tom: Michael Fassbender

Review: The Wrestler

The Wrestler
Starring: Mickey Rourke, Marisa Tomei, Evan Rachel Wood, Todd Barry, Mark Margolis, Judah Friedlander
Director: Darren Aronofsky
Writer: Robert Siegel

Two great thrills for the movie buff are herein. 1) Witnessing the perfect synergy between actor and character, when the real blends with the reel and the voyeuristic pleasure of witnessing a real person accessing darker parts of their soul for our entertainment. 2) Watching a visionary, visually intense director switch into making a near-genre piece on which they are able to impose their own style and filmmaking values, e.g. David Lynch with The Straight Story.

The Wrestler provides this through both an astounding, physical and committed performance by Mickey Rourke, allowing his audience to understand the parallels between himself and his character and to look clean into his soul and empathise/sympathise with his pain. Then we have Aronofsky, coming off the challenging, often beautiful The Fountain, who employs Cassavetes-esque neo-realist filmmaking techniques in telling a relatively straightforward story. It should be a sports movie, but it falls more into becoming a theatre film, an exploration of art and performance and the overwhelming need to achieve. In that sense, it falls more in line with Pi and oddly The Fountain, the latter in our watching of Rourke’s Randy ‘The Ram’ Robinson fighting to remain a star, obsessively seeking acceptance and love in comparison to the obsession of Hugh Jackman’s character in the real-world portions of the film when he is fighting obsessively for something he loves.

The film ostensibly follows the life of pro-wrestler Randy, spending his time wrestling in town halls and strip clubs and unable to pay the rent on his trailer home. Randy then suffers a heart-attack after a particularly fierce hardcore bout, medically ending his career as a wrestler. After this life-altering experience, Randy switches his focus to try and pursue a romantic relationship with aging stripper Cassidy, played with grace and complexity by Marisa Tomei, and his estranged daughter Stephanie, played by Evan Rachel Wood with a great line in teenage anger and tears but little behind the façade.

Randy is an eternal entertainer, consistently looking for love and acceptance from those around him. In the film’s most joyous moments, we watch him perform for customers behind a deli counter, dishing out one-liner alongside egg salads and side of ham. The scene is indicative of so many sequences in the film when Randy is outside of the wrestling arena. During a recent interview with Aronofsky, Elvis Mitchell pointed out the ceilings and lighting often being low and encroaching, giving the sense that Randy is too big for many of the rooms in which he stands. When he is backstage before a bout, those around him ingratiate not only with their admiration for Randy as a competitor, but also with their physical size. He no longer looks hulking or out of place, which can also be attributed to his hair and general features.

Much of the brilliance of the film needs to be attributed to Rourke and Aronofsky. The script, by Robert Siegel, employs a number of basic sports movie traits and clichés, even through the driving portion of the narrative by which Randy has a major medical scare and then must re-evaluate his life, only to once more come back to the fray for one last fight. Some of the dialogue too seems straight out of the handbook but, together with Tomei, the conviction of the actors and nuance of the director mean this never gets in the way.

Marisa Tomei’s transformation of the stripper-with-a-heart-of-gold character into a complex portrait of a woman who, like Rourke, cannot give up the performing and adoration of the crowd is particularly impressive. A key difference in their thematic relationship comes during a scene in which she spends a day with him, coming to meet with in broad daylight with very little make up on yet he remain primped and proper and not too far removed from his persona. It’s a key issue for him that he is unable to separate his two lives. When at home, he plays a wrestling computer game against some kids, playing as himself. In scenes at a bar later on, he is happy to play up the wrestling persona in order to have sex with one of a number of groupies who arise. He is unable to separate his real life from his wrestling persona in the way that Tomei’s character manages to separate Cassidy, the stripper, from Pam, the mother. It’s an outstanding performance from Tomei which, along with her great turn a few years back in In the Bedroom, should put any perceptions relating to My Cousin Vinny behind her.

Rourke is though, worthy of all the plaudits. He is accessing parts of his soul that few actors can. The volatility and self-destructive nature exhibiting constantly by Randy throughout must have chimed with Rourke himself. As much as anything, it proves him amongst the finest actors America has ever produced. He was always great during his hey day in works like Diner and Angel Heart, but this is quite different. He captures heart and soul both during his time as the entertainer and wrestler, and during the quiet moments with Wood and Tomei. He is gentle and sweet but destructive and hurtful. The exchange between he and Tomei when the two argue fiercely over what kind of connection they have is painful to witness but not once does it fall beyond the realm of being believable. It’s a performance which, through capturing those quiet intimacies and the grandstanding emotional weight, could and should win him an Oscar.

Aronofsky probably won’t win anything but he really should. This is toned down ten-fold from the hyper-frenetic editing of Requiem for a Dream or from the quasi-biblical imagery of The Fountain. He is pulls back his camera, allowing the audience to just witness the character rather than be placed within the protagonist’s mind. He allows the performance from Rourke to impress from the third person, never allowing it all to become too wrapped up in providing answers as to who is right or wrong in any of the situation, or enough information to prevent the ending’s enigmatic probing. The final shot of the film is indeed his finest achievement thus far. Building to it beautifully, the final ten minutes or so become completely transcendent, moving beyond basic filmmaking to find humanity beyond the tears you will almost certainly shed. Much also must go in praise to Maryse Alberti, well-known as a documentary cinematographer who here not only shows the wrestling bouts with visceral detail, but knows and understands how to present a character and place rather than create one. It’s cinematography that, like Aronofsky’s direction, is not showy enough to win Oscars but its just the kind of subtle understanding that they should concentrate on.

While the script may not live up to the whole piece, the film remains borderline perfect for me. I would suggest that while the dialogue is somewhat corny and the narrative itself clichéd, the beats of the story work very well in creating a nice structure to the film. Nothing happens which seems out of place or overly-convoluted. Add to this the best performance from a leading actor this side of the millennium, a sterling supporting turn from Tomei, gorgeous and brutal photography from Maryse Alberti and understated direction from Aronofsky, I think you have one of the year’s most satisfying movie experiences.

MOD Rating: ♦♦♦♦♦