Tag Archives: chace crawford

News Morsels

Will Smith

Will Smith’s Overbrook Entertainment is to team with Sony on an adaptation of the life of John Keller, a former marine reponsible for saving 244 of his neighbours in the aftermath of Katrina in New Orleans. I feel tears and Oscars around the corner.

Steven Soderbergh is interviewed, fascinatingly, on Suicide Girls. With The Girlfriend Experience, Sasha Grey does the same with The AV Club.

Gossip Girl’s Chace Crawford has signed up to star in the remake of Footloose, replacing the long-attached Zac Efron.

Zach Braff has signed on to direct, rewrite and star in Swingles, from a spec script by Duncan Birmingham. I liked Garden State first time, less second. 

President Barack Obama has delivered his verdict on Star  Trek.

The great Peter Yates film, The Friends of Eddie Coyle, starring Robert Mitchum, has been released through Criterion. It’s reviewed by RoS here.

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From Twenty-Three to Twelve for Schumacher

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Joel Schumacher, that challenger of quality and sometime above-competent director, has lined up his next project following from thriller Creek. The latter has been all over the release schedules and still doesn’t have a date of release, probably meaning it will end up going straight-to-DVD, especially given the lack of currency Schumacher has following the terrible Number 23.

His next work is to be Twelve, an adapation of Nick McDonnell’s book of the same name which follows a drop-out who turns to drug-dealing and gets involved in a murder case involving his best friend.

The cast racked up thus far is quite interesting, taking in Gossip Girl’s Chace Crawford, Emma Roberts, Rory Culkin, 50 Cent, Ellen Barkin and Kiefer Sutherland, the latter linking with Schumacher for the first time since cult teen vampire flick The Lost Boys in 1987.

Schumacher has had some grand and specutacular failures in the past and his clout is low, but I would at least like to see him take on a project which, to be honest, sounds very much akin to a 1980s-set Brett Easton Ellis novel, possibly transporting Schumacher back into the decade when he had some relative creative success.